Space Tethers and Space Elevators [electronic resource] / by Michel van Pelt.

By: van Pelt, Michel [author.]Contributor(s): SpringerLink (Online service)Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Publisher: New York, NY : Springer New York, 2009Description: X, 215 p. online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780387765563Subject(s): Engineering | Astrophysics | Astronomy | Astronautics | Engineering | Extraterrestrial Physics, Space Sciences | Popular Science in Astronomy | Aerospace Technology and AstronauticsAdditional physical formats: Printed edition:: No titleOnline resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Preface -- Introduction -- Limits to Rocket Propulsion -- New Materials -- Tether Types -- Early Experiments -- Into Space -- 12,000,000th Floor: Space -- Earth Orbit -- Spacecraft Stabilization -- Changing Momentum -- Generating Electrical Power -- Into the Solar System -- Technological Challenges -- Conclusion -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- Books and Reports -- Papers, articles and presentations -- Webpages.
In: Springer eBooksSummary: On Earth, tethers or ropes or lines are used primarily to bind things to each other. In Space, tethers can also be used to attach spacecraft to each other, but this technology involves much more than simply tying things together. Ropes can also be used to climb, to reach places higher up – maybe all the way into space and in fact this concept exists in the form of a space elevator, consisting of a long, incredibly strong cable that stretches from the Earth’s surface into space. Solar powered "climber" machines, which are already under development, could use such a cable to haul cargo into orbit. Space tethers could also be used as a means of transportation, to swing from one place to another. In stories on Earth, Tarzan uses liana vines to swing from tree to tree, and there are many serious ideas for using tethers in space in a somewhat similar way: swinging satellites into another orbit, or even passing them from tether to tether all the way to the Moon and Mars! Although this sounds like science fiction, many space missions using tethers have already flown. Most of them have been relatively small and experimental, but in the near future space tethers have the potential to revolutionize space flight.
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Preface -- Introduction -- Limits to Rocket Propulsion -- New Materials -- Tether Types -- Early Experiments -- Into Space -- 12,000,000th Floor: Space -- Earth Orbit -- Spacecraft Stabilization -- Changing Momentum -- Generating Electrical Power -- Into the Solar System -- Technological Challenges -- Conclusion -- Glossary -- Bibliography -- Books and Reports -- Papers, articles and presentations -- Webpages.

On Earth, tethers or ropes or lines are used primarily to bind things to each other. In Space, tethers can also be used to attach spacecraft to each other, but this technology involves much more than simply tying things together. Ropes can also be used to climb, to reach places higher up – maybe all the way into space and in fact this concept exists in the form of a space elevator, consisting of a long, incredibly strong cable that stretches from the Earth’s surface into space. Solar powered "climber" machines, which are already under development, could use such a cable to haul cargo into orbit. Space tethers could also be used as a means of transportation, to swing from one place to another. In stories on Earth, Tarzan uses liana vines to swing from tree to tree, and there are many serious ideas for using tethers in space in a somewhat similar way: swinging satellites into another orbit, or even passing them from tether to tether all the way to the Moon and Mars! Although this sounds like science fiction, many space missions using tethers have already flown. Most of them have been relatively small and experimental, but in the near future space tethers have the potential to revolutionize space flight.

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