MEMS: A Practical Guide to Design, Analysis, and Applications [electronic resource] / edited by Jan G. Korvink, Oliver Paul.

By: Korvink, Jan G [editor.]Contributor(s): Paul, Oliver [editor.] | SpringerLink (Online service)Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Publisher: Berlin, Heidelberg : Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2006Description: XXV, 965 p. online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783540336556Subject(s): Engineering | Microwaves | Electronics | Optical materials | Nanotechnology | Engineering | Electronics and Microelectronics, Instrumentation | Optical and Electronic Materials | Nanotechnology | Microwaves, RF and Optical EngineeringAdditional physical formats: Printed edition:: No titleDDC classification: 621.381 LOC classification: TK7800-8360TK7874-7874.9Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Microtransducer Operation -- Material Properties: Measurement and Data -- MEMS and NEMS Simulation -- System-Level Simulation of Microsystems -- Thermal-Based Microsensors -- Photon Detectors -- Free-Space Optical MEMS -- Integrated Micro-Optics -- Microsensors for Magnetic Fields -- Mechanical Microsensors -- Semiconductor-Based Chemical Microsensors -- Microfluidics -- Biomedical Systems -- Microactuators -- Micromachining Technology -- LIGA Technology for R&D and Industrial Applications -- 17 Interface Circuitry and Microsystems.
In: Springer eBooksSummary: MEMS are rapidly moving from the research laboratory to the mar­ ketplace. Many market studies indicate not only a tremendous market potential of MEMS devices; year by year we see the actual market grow as the technology matures. In fact, these days, many large silicon foundries have a MEMS group exploring this promising technology, including such giants as INTEL and Motorola. Yet MEMS are fundamentally different from microelectronics. This means that companies with an established track record in these branches need to adapt their skills, whereas companies that want to enter the "miniaturization" market need to establish an entirely new set of capabil­ ities. The same can be said of engineers with classical training, who will also need to be educated toward their future professional activity in the MEMS field. Here are some questions that a company or technologist may ask: I have an existing product with miniaturization market poten­ tial. Which technology should I adopt? What are the manufacturing options available for miniaturiza­ tion? What are the qualitative differences? How do we maintainamarketleadforproductsbased onMEMS? Is there CAD support?Can we outsource manufacturing? Which skills in our current capability need only adaptation? What skills need to be added? Professors Jan Korvink and Oliver Paul have set out to answer these questions in a form that addresses the needs of companies, commercial practitioners, and technologists.
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Microtransducer Operation -- Material Properties: Measurement and Data -- MEMS and NEMS Simulation -- System-Level Simulation of Microsystems -- Thermal-Based Microsensors -- Photon Detectors -- Free-Space Optical MEMS -- Integrated Micro-Optics -- Microsensors for Magnetic Fields -- Mechanical Microsensors -- Semiconductor-Based Chemical Microsensors -- Microfluidics -- Biomedical Systems -- Microactuators -- Micromachining Technology -- LIGA Technology for R&D and Industrial Applications -- 17 Interface Circuitry and Microsystems.

MEMS are rapidly moving from the research laboratory to the mar­ ketplace. Many market studies indicate not only a tremendous market potential of MEMS devices; year by year we see the actual market grow as the technology matures. In fact, these days, many large silicon foundries have a MEMS group exploring this promising technology, including such giants as INTEL and Motorola. Yet MEMS are fundamentally different from microelectronics. This means that companies with an established track record in these branches need to adapt their skills, whereas companies that want to enter the "miniaturization" market need to establish an entirely new set of capabil­ ities. The same can be said of engineers with classical training, who will also need to be educated toward their future professional activity in the MEMS field. Here are some questions that a company or technologist may ask: I have an existing product with miniaturization market poten­ tial. Which technology should I adopt? What are the manufacturing options available for miniaturiza­ tion? What are the qualitative differences? How do we maintainamarketleadforproductsbased onMEMS? Is there CAD support?Can we outsource manufacturing? Which skills in our current capability need only adaptation? What skills need to be added? Professors Jan Korvink and Oliver Paul have set out to answer these questions in a form that addresses the needs of companies, commercial practitioners, and technologists.

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