Advances in Fracture Research [electronic resource] : Honour and Plenary Lectures Presented at the 11th International Conference on Fracture (ICF11), Held in Turin, Italy, on March 20–25, 2005 / edited by Alberto Carpinteri, Yiu-Wing Mai, Robert O. Ritchie.

By: Carpinteri, Alberto [editor.]Contributor(s): Mai, Yiu-Wing [editor.] | Ritchie, Robert O [editor.] | SpringerLink (Online service)Material type: TextTextLanguage: English Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer Netherlands, 2006Description: VI, 262 p. online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781402054235Subject(s): Engineering | Mechanics | Mechanics, applied | Materials | Mechanical engineering | Engineering | Structural Mechanics | Structural Materials | Mechanics | Theoretical and Applied Mechanics | Continuum Mechanics and Mechanics of MaterialsAdditional physical formats: Printed edition:: No titleDDC classification: 620.1 LOC classification: TA349-359Online resources: Click here to access online
Contents:
Editorial -- ICF11 Official speeches -- Fractal analysis and synthesis of fracture surface roughness and related forms of complexity and disorder -- Scaling phenomena in fatigue and fracture -- ICF contribution to fracture research in the second half of the 20th century -- Inverse analyses in fracture mechanics -- Nanoprobing fracture length scales -- Application of fracture mechanics concepts to hierarchical biomechanics of bone and bone-like materials -- Development of the local approach to fracture over the past 25 years: Theory and applications -- The effect of hydrogen on fatigue properties of metals used for fuel cell system -- A cohesive zone global energy analysis of an impact loaded bi-material strip in shear -- Laboratory earthquakes -- Electromigration failure of metal lines -- Modern domain-based discretization methods for damage and fracture.
In: Springer eBooksSummary: Biological materials are bottom-up designed systems formed from billions of years of natural evolution. In the long course of Darwinian competition for survival, nature has evolved a huge variety of hierarchical and multifunctional systems from nucleic acids, proteins, cells, tissues, organs, organisms, animal communities to ecological s- tems. Multilevel hierarchy a rule of nature. The complexities of biology provide an opportunity to study the basic principles of hierarchical and multifunctional s- tems design, a subject of potential interest not only to biomedical and life sciences, but also to nanosciences and nanotechnology. Systematic studies of how hierarchical structures in biology are related to their functions and properties can lead to better understanding of the effects of aging, diseases and drugs on tissues and organs, and may help developing a scienti?c basis for tissue engineering to improve the standard of living. At the same time, such studies may also provide guidance on the dev- opment of novel nanostructured hierarchical materials via a bottom-up approach, i. e. by tailor-designing materials from atomic scale and up. Currently we barely have any theoretical basis on how to design a hierarchical material to achieve a part- ular set of macroscopic properties. The new effort aiming to understand the re- tionships between hierarchical structures in biology and their mechanical as well as other functions and properties may provide challenging and rewarding opportunities for mechanics in the 21st century.
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Editorial -- ICF11 Official speeches -- Fractal analysis and synthesis of fracture surface roughness and related forms of complexity and disorder -- Scaling phenomena in fatigue and fracture -- ICF contribution to fracture research in the second half of the 20th century -- Inverse analyses in fracture mechanics -- Nanoprobing fracture length scales -- Application of fracture mechanics concepts to hierarchical biomechanics of bone and bone-like materials -- Development of the local approach to fracture over the past 25 years: Theory and applications -- The effect of hydrogen on fatigue properties of metals used for fuel cell system -- A cohesive zone global energy analysis of an impact loaded bi-material strip in shear -- Laboratory earthquakes -- Electromigration failure of metal lines -- Modern domain-based discretization methods for damage and fracture.

Biological materials are bottom-up designed systems formed from billions of years of natural evolution. In the long course of Darwinian competition for survival, nature has evolved a huge variety of hierarchical and multifunctional systems from nucleic acids, proteins, cells, tissues, organs, organisms, animal communities to ecological s- tems. Multilevel hierarchy a rule of nature. The complexities of biology provide an opportunity to study the basic principles of hierarchical and multifunctional s- tems design, a subject of potential interest not only to biomedical and life sciences, but also to nanosciences and nanotechnology. Systematic studies of how hierarchical structures in biology are related to their functions and properties can lead to better understanding of the effects of aging, diseases and drugs on tissues and organs, and may help developing a scienti?c basis for tissue engineering to improve the standard of living. At the same time, such studies may also provide guidance on the dev- opment of novel nanostructured hierarchical materials via a bottom-up approach, i. e. by tailor-designing materials from atomic scale and up. Currently we barely have any theoretical basis on how to design a hierarchical material to achieve a part- ular set of macroscopic properties. The new effort aiming to understand the re- tionships between hierarchical structures in biology and their mechanical as well as other functions and properties may provide challenging and rewarding opportunities for mechanics in the 21st century.

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